Signs & Symptoms

Accute Stress Disorder

Symptoms of Acute Stress Disorder

(DSM-5)

-Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing dreams & memories of traumatic ecent(s)

-Dissociative reactions (such as flashbacks) of the traumatic event(s) were recurring

-Intense psychological distress in response to cues that resemble the traumatic event(s)

-Inability to experience positive emotions. (happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings)

-An altered sense of one’s surroundings or self

-Inability to remember important aspects of the traumatic event(s)

-Efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings associated with traumatic event(s)

-Efforts to avoid people, places, activities, objects, or situations that cause distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s)

-Irritable behavior and angry outbursts (with little or no provocation) toward people or objects

-Hypervigilance

-Problems with concentration

-Exaggerated startle response

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

(ADHD)

Inattention Signs & Symptoms of ADHD

(DSM-5)

-Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or during other activities

-Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (such as difficulties  remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading)

-Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly

-Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily side-tracked)

-Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities

-Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort

-Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (such as school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile phones, etc.)

-Is often easily distracted by unrelated thoughts

-Is often forgetful in daily activities (such as returning calls, paying bills, keeping appointments)

Hyperactivity & Impulsivity
 

-Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet or squirms in seat

-Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected

-Often runs aabout or climbs in situations where it is inappropriate (in adults this may be limited to feeling restless)

-Often unable to play or engage in leisure activities quietly

-Is often “on the go,” acting as if driven by a motor (uncomfortable being still for extended time, as in restaurants, meetings)

-Often talks excessively

-Often blurts ou an answer before a question has been completed (completes people’s sentences or cannot wait for turn in conversation

-Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn in line

-Often interrupts or intrudes on others

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Agoraphobia

Signs of Agoraphobia

(DSM-5)

Marked fear or anxiety about two (or more) of the following five situations:

          -Using public transportation

          -Being in open spaces

          -Being in enclosed places (shops, theaters, cinemas, etc.)

          -Standing in line or being in a crowd

          -Being outside of the home alone

The individual fears or avoids these situations because of thoughts that escape might be difficult or help might not be available in the event of developing panic-like symptoms or other incapacitating or embarrassing symptoms.

The agoraphobic situations almost always provoke fear of anxiety.

The agoraphobic situations are actively avoided, require the presense of a companion, or are endured with intense fear or anxiety.

The fear or anxiety is out of proportion to the actual danger posed by the agoraphobic situations and to the sociocultural context.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance is persistent, typically lasting for 6 months or more.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

If another medical condition is present, the fear, anxiety, or avoidance is clearly excessive.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder (for example, the symptoms are not confined to a specific phobia, situational type; do not involve only social situations, and are not related exclusively to obsessions, perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance, reminders of traumatic events, or fear of separation.

Emergency Resources

 

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Bipolar Disorder

(Manic Depressive Disorder)

Symptoms of Bipolar Manic Episode

(DSM-5)

 

-Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity

-Decreased need for sleep

-More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking

-Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing

-Distractability, as reported or observed

-Excessive in activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (reckless behavior such as shopping sprees, sexual indiscretions, foolish/risky investments)

Symptoms of Major Depressive Episode

 

-Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day  (feels sad, empty, or hopeless)

-Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all activities most of the day, nearly every day

-Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain

-Decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day

-Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day

-Restlessness or feelings of being slowed down

-Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day

-Feelings of worthlessness or excessive inappropriate guilt nearly every day

-Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness nearly every day

-Recurrent thoughts of death, recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide **If you are having Suicidal Thoughts or thinking of hurting yourself, call the National Suicide Lifeline immediately: (800) 273-8255 **

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Depression

(Major Depressive Disorder)

(Clinical Depression)

Symptoms of Depression

(DSM-5)

-Depressed mood (such as feeling sad, empty, or hopeless) most of the day, nearly every day.

-Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all or almost all activities of the day, nearly every day.

-Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain.

-Decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.

-Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day.

-Restlessness or feelings of being slowed down.

-Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day.

-Feelings of worthlessness or excessive inappropriate guilt nearly every day.

-Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness nearly every day.

-Recurrent thoughts of death, recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide.**If you are having Suicidal Thoughts or thinking of hurting yourself, call the National Suicide Lifeline immediately: (800) 273-8255 **

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

(OCD)

Signs of OCD Obsessions

(DSM-5)

Recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or images that are experienced, at some time during the disturbance as intrusive and unwanted, and that in most indiciduals cause marked anxiety or distress.

The individual attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, urges, or images, or to neutralize them with some other thought or action (for example, by performing a compulsion).

 

Signs of OCD Compulsions

Repetative behaviors, such as hand washing, ordering, checking on things repeatedly.

Mental acts such that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rules that must be applied rigidly, such as repeatedly praying, counting, repeating words silently.

The behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation; however, these behaviors or mental acts are not connected in a realistic way with what they are designed to neutralize or prevent, or are clearly excessive.

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Panic Attack

&

Panic Disorder

Symptoms of a Panic Attack

(DSM-5)

 

-Palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate.

-Sweating

-Trembling or shaking

-Sensations of shortness of breath or smothering

-Feelings of choking

-Chest pain or discomfort

-Nausia or abdominal distress

-Feeling dizzy, unsteady, light-headed, or faint

-Chills or heat sensations

-Numbness or tingling sensations

-Derealization (feeling of unreality) or depersonalization (being detached from oneself)

-Fear of losing control or “going crazy”

-Fear of dying.

 

Signs of Panic Disorder

 

Recurrent, unexpected panic attacks.

Persistent concern or worry about additional panic attacks or their consequences.

A significant maladaptive change in behavior related to the attacks (behaviors designed to avoid having panic attacks, such as avoidance of exercise or unfamiliar situations).

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

(PTSD)

Causes of PTSD

(DSM-5)

Directly experiencing traumatic event(s).

Witnessing, in person, the event(s) as it occurred to others.

Learning that the traumatic event(s) occurred to a close family member or close friend. In cases of actual or threatened death of a family member or friend, the event(s) must have been violent or accidental.

Experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details or traumatic event(s), such as first responders collecting human remains or police officers repeatedly exposed to details of child abuse.

 

Symptoms of PTSD

-Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic event(s)

-Recurrent distressing dreams in which the content and/or affect of the dream are related to the traumatic event(s)

-Dissociative reactions, such as flashbacks, in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring

-Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s)

-Marked physiological reactions to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s)

-Avoidence of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s)

-Avoidence of or efforts to avoid external rminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s)

-Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic event(s).

-Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world

-Persistent, distorted cognitions about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event(s) that lead the individual to blame himself/herself or others

-Persistent negative emotional state, such as fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame

-Diminished interest or participation in significant activities

-Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others

-Persistent inability to experience positive emotions, such as happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings

-Irritable behavior and angry outbursts (with little or no provocation) typically expressed as a verbal or physical aggression toward people or objects

-Reckless or self-destructive behavior

-Hypervigilance

-Exaggerated startle response

-Problems with concentration

-Sleep disturbance

Emergency Resources

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

 

Social Anxiety Disorder

(Social Phobia)

Signs of Social Anxiety Disorder

(DSM-5)

Fear or anxiety about one or more social situations in which the individual is exposed to possible scrutiny by others, such as having a conversation or meeting unfamiliar people.

The individual fears that he or she will act in a way or show anxiety symptoms that will be humiliating or embarrassing, lead to rejection, or offend others.

Social situations almost always provoke fear or anxiety.

Social situations are avoided or endured with intense fear or anxiety.

The fear or anxiety is out of proportion to the actual threat posed by the social situation and to the sociocultural context.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance is persistent, typically lasting 6 months or more.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance is not attributed to the effects substance abuse, a medication, or another medical condition.

The fear, anxiety, or avoidance is not better explained by the symptoms of another metnal disorder, such as panic disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, or autism spectrum disorder.

If another medical condition (such as Parkinson’s disease, obesity, disfigurement from burns or injury) is present, the fear, anxiety, or avoidance is clearly unrelated or is excessive.

Emergency Resources

 

The above is for general educational purposes and is not intended to be a substitute for consultation with a trained professional. If you need assistance, please call me or email me so I can help you. If I can't, I will refer you to a reputable, reliable professional with experience helping people in your situation.

Cognitive Therapy of Yuma

(928) 750 1774
kevinbenbow@counselingsecure.com

202 S 1st Ave #104 Yuma, AZ 85364

Life is not always easy. I'm here to help.

Resources

If you are thinking of hurting yourself,

please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline immediately: (800) 273-8255